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Digital production studio, Neu and creative comms agency Wire have launched a digital button that makes it easier for the voting public to petition their local MP to put a stop to prime minister Theresa May's proposed Brexit deal.

The tool was designed to make it as easy as possible for constituents to influence the Brexit deal vote on Tuesday 11 December at the House of Commons, by flooding the inbox of MPs. Due to the vote's recent announcement, the teams told The Drum there was a rapid turnaround on the project if it was to prove effective in sparking emails this weekend. 

The online tool locates users’ MPs from their address details and generates a letter of objection, all sent from the sender’s email address.

Pam Scobbie, creative director and co-founder of Wire, said: "Like so many, we’ve felt pretty powerless to stop the absolute car-crash that’s Brexit. So, when Neu approached us to collaborate on their idea, it was an immediate yes.  

“Agencies, in general, need to do more to back causes they believe in. We’ve got the power and the skillset to shout loudly, to get noticed and help galvanise people - which is exactly what we hope to do with Exit Brexit.” 

Neu product manager Richard Phillips-Kerr said: “The government and party whips are compelling MPs to vote ‘on behalf of their constituents’ when considering the PM’s deal. That gave us the idea for Exit Brexit. We wanted to give constituents a really simple vehicle to directly express their anger and dissatisfaction.

“The digital generation is less likely to contact their MPs in traditional ways like writing a letter or during constituency sessions. We built www.exitbrex.it to be the quickest and easiest way for people to let their MP know how they feel about Brexit.”

Neu founder Grant MacLennan outlined his fears that the current government "ignores rational thought and embarks on a pursuit of puritanical democratic ideals above all else".

He expressed fears of a "economic slowdown, a weaker security network, increased interest rates, falling house prices, a sliding pound, lower wages, unemployment, a further-strained NHS" if May's deal, or no deal, is agreed. 

The tool, available here, has at the time of publishing, 4,318 people have demanded a Brexit exit.

It is not the first time creatives have rallied against the Brexit deal. Senior London marketers recently opened up a spoof London shop making light of the proposed food shortages and rumoured lowered standards that would likely follow a bad, or no, deal Brexit.